Nourishing The Shelves | Nonfiction Books I’ll Read In These Terrifying Times

Hello there allies, archenemies, and everyone in between! In case you need some reminding #JunkTerrorBill #OustYouKnowWho #BlackLivesMatter click the hashtags to get a comprehensive look on the issues and different ways to help as well as keeping your data privacy safe while doing online activism. Also, Kal @ ReaderVoracious have outlined resources and reading recommendations for the BLM movement make sure to check it out through this link!

2020 is almost done with Phase One and I kid you not when I say I’m not ready to die yet in the next half. I mean, if COVID19 ain’t enough to kill me then for sure our government can undoubtedly do that while ALSO infringing my human rights. Am I right or am I right?

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Art by Kiwirxbbit

These terrifying times had opened a lot of eyes and I myself just realized the impact my platform can do. (I sometimes forget that I have followers XD) While I want to badly read books for escapism, I think I already escaped far too long and I want to be more educated not only through what I find online but through nonfiction. I’m hoping I can read them all this month so I can have a more substantial understanding of the history of oppression and be more firm with my arguments.

The Rebel: An Essay on Man In Revolt by Albert Camus

By one of the most profoundly influential thinkers of our century, The Rebel is a classic essay on revolution. For Albert Camus, the urge to revolt is one of the “essential dimensions” of human nature, manifested in man’s timeless Promethean struggle against the conditions of his existence, as well as the popular uprisings against established orders throughout history…read more and add it in Goodreads.

The Conjugal Dictatorship of Ferdinand and Imelda Marcos by Primitivo Mijares

This was actually recommended to me by Kate @ YourTitaKate when I was asking for recommendations in Twitter! While I have read a lot of online articles on the Marcos regime I still don’t know a lot of facts so this will be pretty helpful for me!

This book reports on the best laid plans that paved the way to the Philippines’ dark history: the imposition of martial law in 1972 and the schemes that built and held its infrastructure. Drawing data from his work as Marcos’s media adviser before his defection in 1975, Primitivo Mijares esposes the massive corruption and military abuses under the regime, which has left the nation in ruins….add it on Goodreads.

All Art Is Propaganda: Critical Essays by George Orwell

Although largely known for his classic works of fiction, few have ever been as versed a critic as George Orwell. From providing commentary on such mediums as the theater, film, and literature, and on through the disciplines of politics and linguistics; Orwell understood not only how to communicate his ideas, but also how to articulate them in a manner that left an unmistakable impression…read more and add it on Goodreads

The Anatomy of Fascism by Robert O. Paxton

Fascism was the major political invention of the twentieth century and the source of much of its pain. How can we try to comprehend its allure and its horror? Is it a philosophy, a movement, an aesthetic experience? What makes states and nations become fascist? Acclaimed historian Robert O. Paxton shows that in order to understand fascism we must look at it in action – at what it did, as much as what it said it was about…read more and add it on Goodreads

Three Tigers, One Mountain: A Journey Through The Bitter History and Current Conflicts of China, Korea, and Japan by Michael Booth

There is an ancient Chinese proverb that states, “Two tigers cannot share the same mountain.” However, in East Asia, there are three tigers on that mountain: China, Japan, and Korea, and they have a long history of turmoil and tension with each other. In his latest entertaining and thought provoking narrative travelogue, Michael Booth sets out to discover how deep, really, is the enmity between these three “tiger” nations, and what prevents them from making peace…read more and add it on Goodreads

Amazons of the Huk Rebellion: Gender, Sex, and Revolution in the Philippines by Vina A. Lanzona

Labeled “Amazons” by the national press, women played a central role in the Huk rebellion, one of the most significant peasant-based revolutions in modern Philippine history. As spies, organizers, nurses, couriers, soldiers, and even military commanders, women worked closely with men to resist first Japanese occupation and later, after WWII, to challenge the new Philippine republic…read more and add it on Goodreads

How to Satisfy Your Reader With a Great Ending (With images) | My ...

I have been trying to read out of my comfort zone every month this 2020 and I have lesser fantasy books now that I jumped from one genre to another. I think this is an extremely healthy way for me to broaden my understanding and of course, I can now be qualified to be a little bit well read! HAHAHA. I was never a fan of nonfiction but I’m trying to change it this June. Fingers crossed that I’ll be successful in this self-imposed challenge!

  • Have you read these books before?
  • What other accessible nonfiction books have you read and can you recommend some?
  • What nonfiction books will you read?

5 thoughts on “Nourishing The Shelves | Nonfiction Books I’ll Read In These Terrifying Times

  1. This is such a fantastic list, Divine! I had no idea Camus wrote about revolution, so that is going on my more immediate TBR as I am a fan of his writing.

    Thank you so much for linking to my BLM Resources post! (I am also guilty of forgetting the power of my platform haha)

    Liked by 1 person

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